cinnamon plum merlot sorbet (vegan) | picklesnhoney.com

Cinnamon Plum Merlot Sorbet

cinnamon plum merlot sorbet (vegan) | picklesnhoney.com

Last October, it’s safe to say I ate some of the best vegan food of my life. During a just-long-enough three day getaway to NYC, we followed a very ambitious itinerary that consisted of eating, walking, eating some more, seeing some art (because this trip was for Aaron, too), walking, eating, and then eating again. The walking was a necessary component to allow for all of the eating. Not so much as a way to keep my pants from cutting off circulation in the waist (that’s why I packed flowy dresses and skirts!), but because it allowed us to keep up our appetites. Aaron can always eat, but my itinerary tested even his limits, and so another strategy we used was to never eat until we were full. The key to all that eating, we quickly learned, is to enjoy small meals and savor every bite, stopping when you’re wanting just a little more, and promising yourself you’ll come back for another meal down the road.

cinnamon plum merlot sorbet (vegan) | picklesnhoney.com

cinnamon plum merlot sorbet (vegan) | picklesnhoney.com

One of the most memorable treats I enjoyed that weekend was actually not a meal, but a couple of popsicles from the famous People’s Pops along The High Line. If I had to choose a favorite dessert, I probably couldn’t. But if you really pressed me, I would choose something frozen – ice cream, sorbet, or popsicles. That day in Chelsea, I went with an apple chai popsicle and Aaron ordered cinnaplum. The bolder apple chai overshadowed the cinnaplum in that instance, but it’s a flavor combination I haven’t been able to get out of my head since. I love the challenge of taking something, making it my own, and seeing if I can do it better.

cinnamon plum merlot sorbet (vegan) | picklesnhoney.com

My version involves a whole bottle of merlot, so I win (kidding). It would not be appropriate for a popsicle stand, at least not one without a liquor license. Sidenote: do they have those?

The timing for these popsicles worked out perfectly too, since organic red and black plums were on sale when I went shopping over the weekend. The red plums are prettier and really juicy, but the black plums are sweeter and easier to pit. I used a combination of mostly red with a couple of black plums, but use whichever you like. One thing I would recommend is splurging on a good quality bottle of (vegan) wine. It doesn’t have to be amazing, but you are using the entire bottle, so it’s important to go with a merlot you would drink. And actually, that’s the first step in the recipe: pour yourself a small glass to sip while you make the sorbet. I gave my glass to Aaron and then made sure to tell him how nice I am.

cinnamon plum merlot sorbet (vegan) | picklesnhoney.com

cinnamon plum merlot sorbet (vegan) | picklesnhoney.com

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Cinnamon Plum Merlot Sorbet

cinnamon plum merlot sorbet (vegan) | picklesnhoney.com

Cinnamon Plum Merlot Sorbet

Gluten Free, Vegan,

Serves: about 4 cups


Prep Time: 6 hours

Cook Time: 20 mins

Cinnamon and plum is a flavor combination I discovered last year, and it's one that works so well, I haven't stopped thinking about it since. It's even better, of course, with a fruity merlot in the mix.

cinnamon plum merlot sorbet (vegan) | picklesnhoney.com

Cinnamon Plum Merlot Sorbet

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Ingredients

  • 1 bottle good quality vegan, fruity merlot, minus 1/2 of a glass
  • 3/4 cup coconut sugar
  • 1/2 cup filtered water
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 3 cups sliced, pitted plums (about 5-6 plums)
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Cuisine: Gluten Free, Vegan Servings: about 4 cups

Prep Time: 6 hours Cook Time: 20 mins

Cinnamon and plum is a flavor combination I discovered last year, and it's one that works so well, I haven't stopped thinking about it since. It's even better, of course, with a fruity merlot in the mix.

Instructions

  • Pour yourself a small glass of wine. Smell, sip, savor. Okay, now you may begin the recipe.
  • Add the remaining merlot, coconut sugar, water, and cinnamon into a medium saucepan, whisk together, cover, and bring to a low boil. Stir to dissolve the sugar, then add in the plums. Cover and bring to a low boil once more, then reduce to a simmer. Stir occasionally until the plums soften (about 12-15 minutes) and remove the saucepan from the heat. Let steep for 20 minutes, then stir in the lemon juice.
  • Pour the mixture through a fine metal sieve over a medium mixing bowl, using a spatula to extract as much of the liquid from the plums as possible.
  • Allow to cool on the counter for 20 minutes, then refrigerate until cold (about 45 minutes).
  • Once chilled, pour the mixture into your ice cream maker, and freeze according to your ice cream maker’s instructions (about 20 minutes) until just frozen. The texture will resemble a frozen drink.
  • Transfer the sorbet to a freezer-safe container and allow it to harden in the freezer for 4 hours, or until it reaches your desired consistency.

Notes [2]

Don’t be deterred by the prep time. Nearly all of it is inactive while you wait for the sorbet to freeze.

If you don’t have an ice cream maker, I’m thinking this would be excellent simply frozen. It will be a bit icier, but delicious nonetheless because the alcohol will keep it from becoming rock hard. If you give this method a try, please report back in the comments and let us know how it turned out!

Copyright © 2022 Amanda Maguire for Pickles & Honey

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  1. A few weeks ago, I just made a sorbet for the first time and loved it! I didn’t add any booze though – I love the sound of adding merlot! Can’t wait to try it out. 🙂

    1. Amanda says

      That’s great that your first sorbet was a success! I like adding a little booze (or a whole bottle in this case. Ha!) to mine because it keeps the texture really scoopable.

  2. Well anything with wine in it has to be good right? 😉

    What a fantastic idea: only eat just until you want a little more. Never get full. I suppose technically this is how we should be eating all the time, but I love this idea especially for travelling. That way you can eat all the rich, yummy food you want without the side effects of indigestion and lethargy afterwards 🙂

    1. Amanda says

      As I was writing about not eating to the point of being overly full, I had the same thought: why don’t I do this all the time?! It’s always those last few bites that put me over the edge. 🙂 We did so much eating that weekend in NYC and I never once felt like I was in a food coma. It was awesome!

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